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About this group

A Support Group for those with Celiac Disease
Living gluten free in Colorado Springs and
adapting to a gluten-free lifestyle

  Contact the manager of this GroupSpaces group
Category: Common Interest > Health & Wellbeing

Upcoming Events

   The September meeting will be a report on the
August Gluten-Free Food Fair. Any ideas, suggestions
can only improve our group's visibility.

   With fall come holidays that turn around food.
Hallowe'en. Thanksgiving. Hannukah. Christmas.
Celiacs Disease is not a reason to give up on your
enjoyment of these holidays and their food.

In October we will discuss how to "un-gluten"
your favorites.

   So you will know just how to make the
goodies for our annual cookie (and anything else) 
exchange in December.

Baking at Altitude

Changes at high-altitude
What to change How to change it Why
Oven temperature Increase 15 to 25°F; use the lower increase when making chocolate or delicate cakes. Since leavening and evaporation proceed more quickly, the idea is to use a higher temperature to “set” the structure of baked goods before they overexpand and dry out.
Baking time Decrease by 5-8 minutes per 30 minutes of baking time. Baking at higher temperatures means products are done sooner.
Sugar Decrease by 1 tablespoon per cup Increased evaporation also increases concentration of sugar, which can weaken the structure of what you’re baking
Liquid Increase by 1 to 2 tablespoons at 3,000 feet. Increase by 1 1/2 teaspoons for each additional 1,000 feet. You can also use extra eggs as part of this liquid, depending on the recipe. Extra liquid keeps products from drying out at higher temperatures and evaporation rates.
Flour At 3,500 feet, add 1 more tablespoon per recipe. For each additional 1,500 feet, add one more tablespoon. In some recipes, a flour with a higher protein content may yield better results. Additional flour helps to strengthen the structure of baked goods.

Leavening

When using baking powder and baking soda, the following chart can help you how to adjust amounts. When baking a recipe that calls both baking powder and baking soda plus an acidic ingredient, like buttermilk or sour cream, try switching to all baking powder and sweet milk.

Baking powder
or baking soda
3,000-5,000 ft. 5,000-6,500 ft 6,500-8,000 ft
1 teaspoon 7/8 1/2 1/4
1 1/2 teaspoons 1 1/4 3/4 1/2
2 teaspoons 1 1/2 1 3/4
2 1/2 teaspoons 1 3/4 1 1/4 1
3 teaspoons 2 1 1/4 1
3 1/2 teaspoons 2 1/2 1 1/2 1
4 teaspoons 2 1/2 1 1/2 1

Cookies

Because cookies bake for a shorter amount of time than bread or cakes, and are relatively low in water and high in fat content, they’re much less susceptible to the vagaries of high-altitude baking. The principle adjustments recommended for cookies baked at higher altitudes (generally considered to be above 3,000 feet) are to increase the water slightly, to help the dough come together, and to decrease the amount of chemical leavens (baking powder, baking soda) used. Experienced high-altitude bakers know to bake at slightly higher temperature, with a shortened baking time. The table below gives guidelines about what adjustments to make for baking cookies at high-altitude:

What to change How to change it Why
Oven temperature Increase 15 to 25°F; use the lower increase when making chocolate or delicate cakes. Since leavening and evaporation proceed more quickly, the idea is to use a higher temperature to “set” the structure of baked goods before they overexpand and dry out.
Baking time Decrease by 5-8 minutes per 30 minutes of baking time. Baking at higher temperatures means products are done sooner.
Sugar Decrease by 1 tablespoon per cup Increased evaporation also increases concentration of sugar, which can weaken the structure of what you’re baking
Liquid Increase by 1 to 2 tablespoons at 3,000 feet. Increase by 1 1/2 teaspoons for each additional 1,000 feet. You can also use extra eggs as part of this liquid, depending on the recipe. Extra liquid keeps products from drying out at higher temperatures and evaporation rates.
Flour At 3,500 feet, add 1 more tablespoon per recipe. For each additional 1,500 feet, add one more tablespoon. In some recipes, a flour with a higher protein content may yield better results. Additional flour helps to strengthen the structure of baked goods.

Cakes, breads and more…

Cakes Use extra eggs to increase liquids; if only part of an egg is needed, use the whites. Crackers and Pie Crusts: Won’t be dramatically affected; will usually need extra water to help the dough to form. Fried Doughs: Lower the frying temperature by 3 degrees per 1,000 feet, and increase cooking times. Quick Breads: Use the guidelines above to make adjustments. Yeast Breads: Decrease the amount of yeast in the recipe by 25%, and make water/flour adjustments as necessary to get a dough with the correct texture. Make sure your bowl has plenty of room for the dough to rise in. Since rising times are much shorter at higher altitudes, you have a number of options to help its flavor.
  • Give the dough one extra rise by punching it down twice before forming it.
  • Try covering the dough and placing it in the refrigerator for its first rise, to slow the action of the yeast give the dough more time to develop.
  • If you have sourdough starter on hand, use some of it for some of the liquid in the recipe.
  • Make a sponge by mixing the yeast, the liquid in the recipe, and 1 to 2 cups of flour. Cover and let the sponge work for a few hours in the refrigerator to develop it.

10 Things I Wish Restaurants Understood About Gluten Intoler

 

Posted: 06/02/2015 5:59 am EDT

0GLUTEN FREE

1. If you post your gluten-free menu on your
website, it's more likely I (and people like me)
will come to your restaurant. So many restaurants
offer separate GF menus, but don't post them
online. How do I know you offer this if you don't
post it? I always evaluate menus online before
I go anywhere. If you have a GF menu, you're
90% of the way to me booking a table.

2. If you offer a variety of gluten-free options
on your menu, please offer something other than
creme brulee, ice cream, and flourless chocolate
cake for dessert. If you don't want to make
gluten-free desserts, there are so many wonderful
bakeries that do. I've been to so many restaurants
where there are wonderful appetizer and entree
options, but the same tired three no-thought
desserts. I don't want to eat any of these ever
again. A restaurant that offers real desserts
would see my family returning again and again.
I understand if you can't make these yourself,
but there now wonderful gluten-free bakeries
in almost all cities where you could buy pastries.
Many restaurants outsource dessert. Why not do
the same for gluten-free options?

0gluten free
3. Please understand that a true gluten-free
friendly restaurant does more than just take
gluten off the plate. I'm so tired of having my
entree options include fish with no sauce, or
steak with no sauce, or chicken without the
couscous. Please make real substitutions instead
of just subtracting things from my plate and still
charging me the same amount. Creating a gluten-
free pan sauce or flavored butter is not hard!
Gluten-free pasta is readily available as are gluten-
free rolls and bread. Cornstarch thickens. Gluten-free breadcrumbs exist.

4. Pay attention to the dietary restrictions of
your guests. If I order the cioppino with rice
noodles and my server knows I am gluten-free
and is hopefully communicating that to the
kitchen, please do not put a piece of toasted
wheat bread on top of my dish. This happens
again and again to my family.

5. If you go to the trouble of creating a gluten-
free menu, or marking items on your menu that
are GF, please inform your servers about whether
your specials contain gluten when you inform
them about the dish. I find that they almost
never know about gluten (even if there is a
dedicated gluten-free menu for regular items)
and always have to go ask. It doesn't inspire
confidence and it creates so much back and
forth to get an answers.

6. Earn big points with a bread alternative.
If you provide bread to your guests, you will
thrill me to no end by offering me a small
plate of raw veggies, pickles, or corn tortilla
chips instead. And yes, I'm happy to pay a
small upcharge for this courtesy.

7. Make sure your gluten-free items really are
gluten-free. I have caught numerous red flags
on the menus in many restaurants - malt
vinegar, beer, soy sauce, or other gluten-
containing ingredients listed on a dish that
is supposed to be gluten-free.

8. If you don't have a gluten-free menu,
at least make sure your servers have a list
of the items on the menu that are gluten-
free, or at the very least that your kitchen
has such a list. I can't make a good decision
about what to eat if the server is going back
and forth to the kitchen with questions and
then coming to my table trying to remember
exactly what the kitchen said. Often much is
lost in translation and a server tells us he
"thinks" something is gluten-free.

9. Be respectful of the promise you are making
with gluten-free food. If you can't protect from
cross-contamination, be honest. People who
order gluten-free items have a variety of needs,
including celiacs who become seriously ill from
small cross-contamination, gluten intolerants who
don't need a separate area in the kitchen but
can't eat food you cook on the same pizza stone
or in the same uncleaned pan where gluten was
cooked, to people who choose to avoid gluten
because they don't want to eat it and are not
impacted by cross-contamination at all. 100%
gluten-free is very hard to achieve. We get it.
So just tell us the truth. Make it clear exactly
what level of gluten-free you're offering so
people can make informed choices.

10. Expand your clientele by realizing that
there really is no reason to use gluten in
nearly every dish on your menu. I've been
stunned when restaurants tell me there is
gluten in items such as risotto or Hollandaise
sauce that do not traditionally include or use
gluten! There are so many alternatives to
gluten that work perfectly well in so many
dishes. I ate at a major chain hotel's restaurant
in Dublin and they told me they use no gluten
in any sauces since so many diners are celiac
or intolerant there and they achieve the same
results with cornstarch. Often people are turned
off at the thought of gluten-free food but the
truth is gluten is unnecessary in so many
recipes and no one cares or knows if you
use cornstarch instead of flour. I cook wonderful
food at home without gluten every single day
and there is almost nothing I can't make. I
would love it if the professionals would come to the same conclusion.

Follow Brette Sember on Twitter: www.twitter.com/BretteSember

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Coupons

Newest Gluten-Free Coupons:

Cherries Coupon – 20% Off Cherries
S&W Coupon – $1/5 S&W Beans Cans
Applegate Coupon – $1/1 Applegate Sliced Deli Meat
Honest Kids Coupon – $0.75/1 Honest Kids, 8 pk
Pacific Foods Coupon – $1/1 Pacific Foods Organic Polenta
Rudi’s Coupon – $0.75/1 Rudi’s Gluten-Free Bakery Product
Sophie’s Kitchen Coupon – $1/1 Sophie’s Kitchen Vegan Seafood Product (gluten free options)
Wiley’s Finest Coupon – $3/1 Wiley’s Finest Wild Alaskan Fish Oil product
Gerber Coupon – $1/2 Gerber 3rd Foods Lil’ Bits (gluten free options)
Emerald Nut Coupon – $0.55/1 Emerald Nut item
ZonePerfect Coupon – $0.50/1 ZonePerfect Bar (gluten free options)
The Laughing Cow Coupon – $0.75/1 The Laughing Cow, 6 oz
Babybel Coupon – $0.75/1 Mini Babybel Cheese product
Seeds of Change Coupon – $1.50/1 Seeds of Change organic food product (gluten free options)

Summer Treat

Quotes

But there can be side effects to living gluten free.  Chronic euphoria is pretty common.  You might experience regular bouts of giddiness along with a skin condition we like to refer to as the gluten free glow.  If symptoms persist, try not to gloat.

10 Signs You May Be Gluten Intolerant


It’s likely you have a friend or relative
that has gone gluten free. Most people
associate going gluten free with either
celiac disease or a new diet craze, but
that is not always the case. Contrary to
some beliefs, most people who go off gluten
are not looking to lose weight, but to improve
their health.

Just because you don’t have celiac disease
doesn’t mean you can’t be gluten intolerant.
Studies have shown that 15% of people in the
US are sensitive to gluten and may have an
intolerance. This intolerance can lead to a
variety of symptoms some people may just
shrug off. In fact, 99% of people with a gluten
intolerance or Celiac disease are never diagnosed.

Here are ten signs you may be gluten intolerant.
1. Digestive Symptoms Digestive symptoms
such as IBS, acid reflux, bloating, diarrhea
or constipation.
2. Skin Issues Gluten intolerance may lead
to skin rashes such as eczema, keratosis pilaris
(chicken skin) or dermatitis herpetiformis, an
itchy rash with pimple-like bumps, or acne.
3. Inflammation Inflammation, aching or
swelling of joints such as knees, fingers or hips.
4. Mood Issues Mood swings, depression,
anxiety and even ADD can all be signs of a
gluten intolerance.
5. Hormonal Imbalances PMS, PCOS or
unexplained infertility.
6. Autoimmune Diseases You have been
diagnosed with an autoimmune disease such
as Lupus, Psoriasis, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis or MS.
7. Neurological Symptoms Feeling dizzy or
off balance.
8. An “Off” Feeling Feeling as though you’re
constantly in a fog may be a sign your body
cannot tolerate gluten. Although this could be
related to a number of things, it may be worth
considering gluten intolerance as a cause.
9. Pain Migraines, headaches or joint pain or
aches may be a reaction to gluten.
10. Fatigue Always tired? If you can’t get to
the bottom of your fatigue issues, it may be
related to gluten intolerance. Especially so if
you feel tired after eating something that
contains gluten.

You don’t need to have all these symptoms
to be gluten intolerant. If you have four or
more of these symptoms or you think you
may have celiac disease or are gluten intolerant,
the best thing to do is ask your doctor for a test.
Even if testing comes back negative for celiac
disease, that doesn’t rule out gluten completely.

If you still feel gluten is causing your symptoms,
try to eliminate it from your diet for 30-60 days.
Keep a journal and jot down how you feel. If
your systems have cleared up after 30-60 days
of not eating gluten and return once you
re-introduce it to your diet, you can probably
conclude that you are gluten intolerant and
may eliminate gluten from your diet permanently.

When going off gluten, don’t forget your
body still needs carbohydrates and fiber.
Try gluten free grains such as quinoa,
buckwheat and rice.

Sources: Myers, Amy MD. 10 Signs You’re
Gluten Intolerant. (January 22, 2013).
MindBodyGreen. Retrieved August 13, 2013
from http://www.mindbodygreen.com/
0-7482/
10-signs-youre-gluten-intolerant.html
Dr. Oz. Gluten Sensitivity Self Test.
(September 25, 2012). Retrieved
August 13, 2013 from http://www.doctoroz.com/
videos/gluten-sensitivity-self-test
Anderson, Jane. Gluten Sensitivity Symptoms.
(March 2, 2013).
Celiac Disease & Gluten Sensitivity.
Retrieved August 13, 2013 from
http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/
glutenintolerance/a/
Gluten-Sensitivity-Symptoms.htm

What is a Gluten-Free restaurant?

Pursuant to our meeting about GF restaurants:
3 steps to choosing a truly gluten-free restaurant http://www.celiactravel.com/articles/
gluten-free-restaurant/

What is Celiac Disease

 

Meeting Minutes

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Forum

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Pikes Peak Celiacs

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