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WP Blazer Review – An Incredible Software for Your WordPress

WP Blazer Review – An Incredible Software for Your WordPress

Official site: https://goo.gl/S6IWue

Since the birth of search engines, marketers have tried just about every tactic imaginable to boost their pages to the top of the results pages. The search engines, in turn, constantly tweak their algorithms to weed out undesirable results (duplicate content entries, keyword-stuffed pages, off-topic backlinks, and other wp blazer review that boost an otherwise irrelevant or weak content page).
Panda 2011 was the year of the Panda updates from Google. With Panda, Google made significant strides to devalue content farms, thin affiliate sites, and duplicate content. It is estimated that 11.8% to 14.5% of all search queries were affected by the various Panda updates. At the heart of Panda was a push for high quality, value content, and trust. In fact, Google's chief engineer, Amit Singhal, published this list of questions for SEO marketers to ask themselves:
Would you trust the information presented in this article?
Is this article written by an expert or enthusiast who knows the topic well, or is it more shallow in nature?
Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?
Would you be comfortable giving your credit card information to this site?
Does this article have spelling, stylistic, or factual errors?
Are the topics driven by genuine interests of readers of the site, or does the site generate content by attempting to guess what might rank well in search engines?
Does the article provide original content or information, original reporting, original research, or original analysis?

Does the page provide substantial value when compared to other pages in search results?
How much quality control is done on content?
Does the article describe both sides of a story?
Is the site a recognized authority on its topic?
Is the content mass-produced by or outsourced to a large number of creators, or spread across a large network of sites, so that individual pages or sites don’t get as much attention or care?
Was the article edited well, or does it appear sloppy or hastily produced?
For a health related query, would you trust information from this 
wp blazer review?
Would you recognize this site as an authoritative source when mentioned by name?
Does this article provide a complete or comprehensive description of the topic?
Does this article contain insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond obvious?
Is this the sort of page you’d want to bookmark, share with a friend, or recommend?
Does this article have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content?
Would you expect to see this article in a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book?
Are the articles short, unsubstantial, or otherwise lacking in helpful specifics?
Are the pages produced with great care and attention to detail vs. less attention to detail?
Would users complain when they see pages from this site?

Below, I have reordered and grouped Amit's questions to prove the point Google is making:
High Quality
Is this article written by an expert or enthusiast who knows the topic well, or is it more shallow in nature?
Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?
Does this article have spelling, stylistic, or factual errors?

Does the article provide original content or information, original reporting, original research, or original analysis?
How much quality control is done on content?
Is the content mass-produced by or outsourced to a large number of creators, or spread across a large network of sites, so that individual pages or sites don’t get as much attention or care?
Was the article edited well, or does it appear sloppy or hastily produced?
Does this article contain insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond obvious?
Would you expect to see this article in a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book?
Are the pages produced with great care and attention to detail vs. less attention to detail?
Value
Are the topics driven by genuine interests of readers of the site, or does the site generate content by attempting to guess what might rank well in search engines?
Does the page provide substantial value when compared to other pages in search results?
Does the article describe both sides of a story?
Does this article provide a complete or comprehensive description of the topic?
Does this article have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content?
Are the articles short, unsubstantial, or otherwise lacking in helpful specifics?
Would users complain when they see pages from this site?
Trust
Would you trust the information presented in this article?
Would you be comfortable giving your credit card information to this site?
Is the site a recognized authority on its 
wp blazer review?
For a health related query, would you trust information from this site?
Would you recognize this site as an authoritative source when mentioned by name?
Is this the sort of page you’d want to bookmark, share with a friend, or recommend? In other words, if you're spending more time on your SEO than on the quality of your content while ignoring your end-user's experience, Google's Panda will treat your site like so much bamboo and chew you up and poop you out (a panda's diet consists of almost 99% bamboo, fyi). And this is likely the case. After all, internet marketers are conditioned and (dare I say “brainwashed”) into thinking we can throw just about anything online and get it ranked at the top of Google in an hour.

Those days, it appears, are over. And good riddance, I say. I prefer quality over quantity any day of the week! But that's just me.
Google started 2012 with a bang! On January 10, Google announced the release of what may be the most significant shake-up in the history of search engines. I know that sounds hyperbolic, but once you understand what's happening, I think you'll agree. Called “Search Plus Your World,” Google is now placing huge significance on three features: 1. Personal Results: which shows you information just for you, such as photos and posts, that are yours or that have been shared specifically with you. These are private results that only you will be able to see on your results page; 2. Profiles in Search: both in autocomplete (aka, Google Instant) and results, which shows you people you're close to or might be interested in following; 3. People and Pages: which shows people profiles and Google+ pages related to a specific topic or area of interest, and allows for easy following with just a few clicks.
These new search results are tied directly into Google+, Google's social network and their alternative to both Twitter and Facebook. The profiles, people, and pages that are shown are Google+ users and brand pages.
This pushes Google+ results over an overall keyword relevancy, it appears, and Twitter and Facebook are already up in arms. And this only fans the flames of the anti-trust allegations Google is embroiled in. But we are not here to discuss the legal ramifications of Google's decisions (let's assume they have some pretty smart lawyers figuring all this out). We're here to maximize our exposure to searchers.
This one sentence in Amit Singhal's Search plus Your World post says everything to me about what Google's mindset is.
They value connections and the community surrounding a particular topic over
the well-designed SEO strategy. They will focus on TRUST—and how trust is developed and nurtured—over a perfectly keyword-optimized blog post. Sure, SEO will continue to play a role in the SERPs (how else will Google populate the remaining results?), but the results Google will highlight—and therefore encourage interaction with—will be our friends, family, and brands that we're already connected to, or that Google recommends we connect with.
Since its launch last summer, marketers have been trying to figure out how best to use Google's social network. The biggest challenge was that Google plainly discouraged the creation of brand/business profiles. (Google went so far as to delete the profiles of several prominent brands.)
That changed in November 2011, and with Search Plus, it's clear that Google now wants brands to create Google+ business pages (and to actively participate in the Google+ community). So there's only one way to go if you want to stay in Google's good graces—and appear at the top of the SERPs. To win, we'll all have to play Google's game.
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