glennreview

VIDEOPAL REVIEW – DISCOUNT AND HUGE BONUS

 VIDEOPAL REVIEW – DISCOUNT AND HUGE BONUS
Official site: https://goo.gl/IjdMqB

In 1997, Marshall moved from the job he had finally found in ‘95 into a sales job with a company selling similar technology to a similar market, but nationally rather than locally. At the first company, the routine had been to go get the manufacturer’s directory and page through it, or sift through boxes of old leads from videopal review , and then hit the phones trying to score an appointment with someone who wanted to see inside the magic suitcase full of samples. Being a manufacturer’s representative turned out to be a very painful job. After two years of chasing down leads, Marshall had had enough. It seemed every deal he set up slipped away or fell apart. He was not making a lot of money, and he was not very happy. When the national company offered him a position, there was a lot to like. Okay, they had no money for travel and airplanes. No money for endless phone calls. No money for pounding pavement. What they did have was a website, and it was getting some modest traffic. A few more lines connected a few more dots, and Marshall started to see that the old picture of business had begun to change. In the old picture, the sales force went out looking for customers who would buy their product. In the new picture, the customers went looking for companies with products they wanted to buy. The customers came to you. Actually, Marshall was helped in this realization by reading books by the man who coined the term “direct marketing.” Now one of the oldest living pioneers in that field, Lester Wunderman conceived American Express, the Doubleday Book Club, and Columbia Records, to name a few. He’s in the Advertising Hall of Fame, was named one of “Top Twenty Advertising Legends and Leaders” by Adweek magazine, and in 1999 was one of the “Top 100  People in Advertising” according to Advertising Age. Marshall calls him brilliant. According to Marshall (and Wunderman), if you have to climb over barbed wire fences and break through the back window to get into a company just to talk to somebody, they might still talk to you, but they aren’t really going to consider you to be some kind of genius expert who probably holds the solution to the big problem they’ve got. More likely, they’ll think of you as a pest. Online, Marshall didn’t have to scale other people’s fences, he only had to open up his own gates. Engineers looking for specialized information found the company’s website and filled out a little form and the information then went to Marshall. So when he called, he knew the people he spoke with wanted to talk to him because they had invited him. For the first six months it felt like therapy, not having to wear down someone’s resistance, just being able to be a helpful resource to people and having customers buy from him because he gave them all the information they could need. Marshall got the biggest sales commission check that he’d ever gotten (although at the time, he admits, that wasn’t saying much), and it sold him on Internet Marketing. Along with Wunderman, Marshall was reading the work of other direct marketing gurus, such as Dan Kennedy’s newsletter, since he saw from the start that the Internet was a direct marketing medium. It may have been a new medium, but nevertheless it had a lot in common with direct mail despite being made up of ones and zeroes and electrons instead of ink on paper. The same principles and metrics applied even though the specifics were a little different: cost per lead, cost per conversion, response rate, average order size, ROI, and lifetime value. Marshall started actively applying an information marketing model to his sales process, creating white papers, troubleshooting guides, reports, newsletters and  magazine articles, and offering the information free in exchange for people’s contact information. He became a lead generation machine, and the reps and distributors were beside themselves. The company was usually one of the smallest companies represented, yet it kept out-generating sales leads compared with the big product lines. Reps would call Marshall, puzzled but nevertheless delighted: “I get more sales leads from you guys than from videopal review, and they’re all good. When I get a lead from you, I know that company has a project, that they plan to spend some money, and even what that project is sometimes. I love your leads. Keep ’em coming.” Marshall finally connected all the dots: the ones who control the leads and traffic run the show. Marshall’s group starting experimenting with “positioning,” beginning by creating a class called “Device Net Boot Camp” (after the name of their product) where they explained the technology while customers downed free coffee and bagels—a “lunch and learn” session. The customers sat there with their arms folded, listening but with no real interest in or intention of buying. At the end, they’d thank Marshall and his crew for the free food and information and leave. Marshall had an inspiration. He and the group created a three-day class with real equipment right there, and charged customers $1,500 to attend. They made up a direct-mail piece, sent out emails, and the classes sold out. The industry hadn’t respected “free,” but the minute people had to pay to learn something they assumed it was first rate. The company had successfully positioned itself as the expert: the company that offered training that explained the whole industry. Information marketing. A large trade organization added its private label to the class which opened it up on a grander scale, 300 customers per class, and Marshall’s company got a huge P.R. boost from the deal. Their competitors were furious since they felt they were the experts, not Marshall’s com  pany and the industry had apparently forgotten that. Marshall’s company was making the big waves and had all the credibility and the others had to settle for being swept along in its wake. The timing was perfect. A company working on a similar technology bought Marshall’s employer out for $18 million, and Marshall escaped with a check five weeks after 9/11. That check became his stake for a consulting business. Since his positioning had made him well known in the field, Marshall got job offers from all around, but he turned them into consulting contracts, unwilling to be fettered once more by a corporate tether. He wanted to sell information products, so he developed a course on lead generation, called it Guerilla Marketing for High-Tech
Sales People, and put it up on PerryMarshall.com. It was free, but it promoted a full-length $1,000 course, and helped Marshall build his list. In April 2002, Marshall talked to Ken McCarthy, mentioning a new thing called pay-per-click and an advertising system called Overture. McCarthy had invited Overture guru, John Kiel, to speak at his upcoming “System Seminar” and recommended that Marshall come and see what it was all about. Kiel expounded on Overture and pay-per-click, and also mentioned that Google had just come out with a product that seemed similar but that he didn’t fully understand yet. Kiel’s impression was that it seemed expensive and complicated. Marshall considered his options. He was a consultant with a few clients; he needed to keep them coming to him, and he needed to sell product. He said to himself, “I don’t use Yahoo! I don’t use MSN. I use Google.” He decided to learn their new system, AdWords. By the end of the week, he was hooked. With AdWords, he could change ads and the next day see the click-through rate change or see how people had responded. He could test keywords, rearrange them, add new ones—evaluate all sorts of things. Marshall learned Adwords inside and 
out. He quintupled the number of leads he was getting daily, and started offering the service to his clients, but he was hesitant to tell anyone too much about it. Most of his competitors were using Overture, doing SEO, and found AdWords mysterious. Months later, McCarthy mentioned that he needed someone to speak about Google AdWords. Marshall suggested Andrew Goodman, the better known AdWords expert, but Goodman had already declined. McCarthy convinced Marshall to speak. Certain that his “15 minutes of fame” would be just that—intense but brief—he planned to make sure he had as much product as he could to sell at the seminar, so he got all his videopal review and books ready for orders. He was thinking he could create interest for three, maybe four months, then everything would go back to normal. But he underestimated the need. People were stumbling into the AdWords program and starting out before they understood how it really worked. When tossing $5 here and $10 there didn‘t work, they fed in more money, like a slot machine, and people were maxing out their credit cards and going broke trying to figure out something that had taken him no time at all. Marshall, however, was still convinced that his guru status would be short lived. He had better “make hay while the sun shines.” Shortly after the seminar, he had listened to Unlimited Traffic Technique, in which Jonathan Mizel said that anyone who can convert visitors to dollars better than everyone else in the market would dominate that market. Marshall knew that while AdWords would get him a lot of clicks, it ultimately wasn’t enough to be good at getting clicks, he had to convert those clicks to sales. Then, about six months after Marshall read Mizel’s book, Mizel called him up. They’d run into each other at several seminars—Marshall was being asked to speak about AdWords more and more—and Mizel wanted to hire Marshall to consult on a project. When Mizel then  suggested that they do an AdWords teleseminar together, Marshall agreed, even though he was a little concerned that it might affect his eBook sales—again, still thinking he should have a plan for when he dropped back into obscurity at any moment. They did the seminar, a live call for $60, sold the reprint rights to affiliates, and moved on to the next project. Or they meant to move on. What they found was that the teleseminar was hot. People were buying it up and MP3s were crisscrossing the country, going overseas, and finally the dots were all connected. Marshall was an Internet Marketing guru. His fifteen minutes of fame has lasted years.
Details:

http://glennreview.com/videopal-review/
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/56154326584299844/
http://www.slideshare.net/glenn1305/videopal-review-discount-and-huge-bonus
https://issuu.com/glenn1305/docs/videopal_review.docx
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5c2ssc
https://tackk.com/fubkax
tag:
buy videopal, download videopal, purchase videopal, review videopal, video pal, video pal review, video pal reviews and bonus, videopal, videopal and features, videopal bonus, videopal by todd gross review, videopal honest review, videopal login, videopal review and bonus, videopal review and get bonus, videopal review bonus, videopal review oto, videopal review upsell, videopal reviews


glennreview

Powered by GroupSpaces · Terms · Privacy Policy · Cookie Use · Create Your Own Group