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Flipside Profits Review – Turning a Small Investment into Huge Profits

Flipside Profits Review – Turning a Small Investment into Huge Profits

Official site: https://goo.gl/movpqf

Because our flipside profits review is to write without having to pause to think, we don’t get fancy with our words. We write in plain language. Conversational language even If you write like you speak, then it becomes easy to write without pausing to think, because it will be as natural as having a conversation with someone. The other part of writing style you want to focus on is writing in an active voice. What is an active voice? Well let’s demonstrate with an example. A passive sentence would go as follows “The money was made by the Internet Marketer.” The active sentence would say “The Internet Marketer made money.” Get the difference? The easiest way to think of this is to put the “action” first. Now that I just introduced this to you, you’ll want to slow down even more when you write to analyze while you write if you are putting the “action” first or not. AHHHH! Don’t pause to think. Instead, let’s refine the exercise I just mentioned a bit ago where you write an article you just read in your own words with the goal of doing so without ever having to pause to think. Well, when you’re done with it, go back through and identify what you think is the most active part of that sentence. If it appears near or at the end, just make a note of it and quickly rewrite that sentence. There you go – in a short amount of time doing just one of these a day you can immediately become a master of active writing and writing without having to think. Now you’re ready to play with the big boys and girls - Outlining The Outline Writing a single, short article is easy to do without pausing to think. But how do you stay on track and not get lost when you’re writing 10,000 words or more? You will learn to live and die by the outline. Not only will it send your productivity through the roof, but it will also make it easier for you to communicate and get those behavioral changes from your audience. Now there are some important things to note about this particular product. It was a product not created by me, though I am the creator of this outline. While it is published by my company, Rapid Crush, Inc., the content was created by Zane Miller under an exclusive contract. Now I am not the YouTube expert – Zane has probably forgotten more about it than I know. So when tasked with coming up with how we were going to create this product, here is how I was able to “suck out” the perfect outline for the products in no time flat, and then create the actual outline of the product in minutes. One more thing to note before we dive into this process – since Zane is already a stone cold expert; this is an example of a “light” outline. If you aren’t so conversant with your subject, then you’d want to go a bit deeper on each of these points. For example instead of just “why video is hot” you might have 3 sub points beneath that point. Outlining Process… It starts with me asking Zane some questions. Here are some of the questions that I asked him: x What do you think is the single most important thing you do with ________ that almost nobody knows about? x What is the easiest possible thing a drop-dead beginner could do to get an immediate result? x What is something(s) that you think are criminally misunderstood related to _______? x What are some of the coolest things you have just recently discovered and are playing with related to _________? Those questions rock! As I ask Zane those questions, I jot down some of the answers. For example, one of the coolest things he was playing with related to YouTube was Google Hangouts. This was a relatively new feature that not a lot of people knew about it. So I jotted that down under the heading of “potential modules.” He also started sharing insights about search engine optimization with YouTube that almost nobody knew about. One of the things he mentioned was you can advertise a certain type a flipside profits review, not pay for it, and get one of the juiciest bank links you could hope for… That immediately gave me the idea for two potential modules: YouTube SEO and YouTube Paid Advertising. I also wrote that free link tidbit down under both as a potential talking point related to that module. When I asked him about the easiest stuff a beginner could do, he told me that with the very basics of YouTube they could easily get paid by local businesses with the right prospecting approach. He goes on to tell me how he gets paid a couple hundred bucks for videos that take him minutes to create. I jot down as a potential module “Offline YouTube.” I got a whole slew of talking point for YouTube SEO when I asked about the most misunderstood aspects of YouTube. When I brought up the sticking points, Zane said one of the biggest is that people think you have to actually make videos to utilize the power of YouTube. Then he told me how he uses playlists to make money on YouTube without ever even having to create a single second of original video content. So I wrote done “Playlists” as a potential module. The questions above also elicited other potential modules and talking points under those modules, which I wrote down. Some of that stuff we ended up using in the “advanced module”, some of didn’t make the cut of the main product outline but we worked it into bonuses. This is the brain dump period of the outline. Nothing is censored. It’s all jotted down as potential modules, if it’s big concepts, and talking points under those modules. Then we go through the chopping block. For all my products, I always like to have an introduction module, so that’s a given. I almost always like to end on an “advanced” module, because it can be a grab bag of everything else I can’t fit neatly into the other modules. Then what I strive for is to take the juiciest modules and start to logically organize them, and cross out and/or merge modules that don’t seem as powerful. How many modules do I aim for? Short answer: depends. Heh. A good rule of thumb, though it is just a general guideline, is price point.

Any product that is $49, I’ll most likely have 6 modules including the introduction and advanced modules. For a $99 to $299 product I’ll shoot for 8 to 12 modules. For something in the $499 range, I will try to get 12 modules in, plus utilize the “spill over” of additional modules as bonuses, add-ons, and so forth. Now when in doubt, leave a module out. That’s my philosophy. It’s better to have fewer, yet more powerful modules than to have lots of weak ones. So for example, Zane told me about how he makes nice looking talking head videos on YouTube, even though he has a shoestring budget home studio set up. This was interesting and I knew beneficial, but ultimately didn’t make it into the final main product because I didn’t think it thematically fit in nice with the rest of the more powerful modules. However, we did end up using it as a bonus for fast action buyers. Now if you studied the outline above for Tube Method, hopefully you’ll begin to notice some patterns. These are written in stone, of course, but it’s a good guideline to follow. If you give at least two step-by-step strategies related to a module, that’s a lot of value in there. You first cover the basics though, so everyone is up to speed. Then at the end, you tie up all loose ends with additional things that did not fit in the scope of your step-by-step methods or the basics. Then you go onto the next module and do the same thing. In this particular case, the product was video based – but the outline is the same regardless of the medium. It is imperative though when you are writing your content to have an outline. I print the outline out right next to me so I can glance at it while writing to always know where I’m going next, and never having to pause to think. Now it’s easy to get too caught up in the outline process knowing it’s going to be used as a “writing in real time” aid. You can spend too much time perfecting your outline, which is wasteful. Here is how you prevent that – you simply set a clock before you start writing the outline. Put a time limit deadline on how long it will take you to create that outline. Then follow that deadline at all costs! Finally, I gave you an example of me interviewing someone else to create the outline. You probably won’t be in that situation. Instead, you have to interview yourself, and then jot down the answers, and base your outline off those. Just like we set a time to create our physical outline, we do the same thing to create our “brain damp” of potential stuff for the outline. We set a timer! I often recommend 30 minutes of brain dumping, 30 minutes of outlining at most. Often you can use less, especially for leaner types of content. Eventually, if you keep at it, you will be able to do almost the whole process in your head. That’s when the world seems to bend to your flipside profits review. Once The Outline Is Finished With the outline in hand, you can now begin to write without thinking, as we previously discussed. I’ll also show you here in a bit how to use this outline for other types of media as well… Let’s hone in on writing for now so we can be done with it first. The hardest thing about writing – or any content creation – is getting into the zone. We discussed the warm up process earlier, and why many people make introductions that are boring. Well, anytime you either start something fresh or take a prolonged break, you have to either be disciplined enough to “hit the ground” running on re-entry, or you have to warm up again. Each warm up slows you down in two ways. First, you just go slower. Second, it takes you longer to get into a “state of flow.” A state of flow is when your conscious becomes so narrowly focused on the primary task at hand that outside distraction, thoughts, and even the perception of time itself changes. Ever been so thoroughly involved in something that you “lost track of time?” I strive to make that happen every single time I sit down to create. For that to happen you need to distraction-proof yourself as much as possible. There are two types of distractions you’ll deal with: (1) External distractions and (2) Internal distractions. Let’s start with external distractions. These are things like the phone ringing, the doorbell chiming, people walking in on you and trying to start conversations, and so forth Now I want you to picture this – I work from home. My office is in the basement. I have three kids, a 7 year old, a 2 year old and a newborn. I also have a nanny that is here full-time 5 days a week during the day. Besides that, I have several employees, hundreds of affiliates and thousands of customers who vie for my time. So if I can do it, you can do it. External Distractions Here are some ways to prevent external distractions, or at the very least – minimize them: x Communicate Your Outcome – my family knows if you interrupt me, it better be important! If you don’t let others know this, then they won’t have any problem barging in on you. Heck, when the maid comes, if I’m in my office they know not to clean it. x Set the Phone to Silent – better still, not only set it to silent, don’t have it anywhere near you. I estimate that my phone is on silent 99% of the time. Hilariously enough, when it isn’t on silent and it rings it drives my family nuts that I rarely get up and answer it while it’s ringing. There is rare, rare, rare exception for you to be needed and available around the clock 24/7. Most things can wait… or better yet, often take care of themselves… x Kill Your Email – Don’t have the damn browser or email client open and easy to reach. If you need to, at the very least log out of your client so even if you’re compelled to access it, hopefully the road bump of putting in your user name and password will deter you. If all else fails, use something kind of tool like Site Block. x Shut Down Skype – 99% of the time I’m on Do Not Disturb Mode with Skype, so I never hear any notifications or have any bouncing icons or any of that jazz. When I create, I hide Skype. I used to have to physically lock myself out of Skype because the compulsion was too strong if it was open, running and I was logged in to want to check it. x Put Twitter & Facebook On Vacation – and any distracting website for that matter. Again, Site Block can come in handy. What I like to do with clients is force them to install a really crappy browser (like Internet Explorer 7) and if they feel the urge to surf the web, they have to do so through a terrible, crippling browser. That usually fixes the tendency quickly. x Be Consistent – pick certain times – and actually schedule them – to create content consistently. Ideally those are times that are similar each day, week, or whatever. For example, I often do most of my writing in the morning. I will do most of my video work in the afternoon. Regardless, I have my time when I’m pretty much not available to the outside world, and that is usually the same “blocks” of time each and every day. Blocking outside distractions will be a toughie, and it will be a continual work in progress. Plus, just when you think you have it down, you become a little lax and it creeps back in. Skype has been kicking my ass lately and I have to work at it again! However, our goal is incremental improvements over the long run. If you just minimize one of these distraction a week, in 6 weeks you should quadruple your output while cutting your “content creation” time down by 25%. Worth it? Yep. External distractions are a beast, yet I would say internal distractions are even worse. While you can turn your phone on silent, you can’t turn your brain on silent from all its distracting thoughts it likes to throw at you. 

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