News and Announcements

More BayBeeeeeez!

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Monday, October 30th, 2017 @ 11:41pm

Our prized Nigerian Dwarf Buck, Copper, is - again - a Papa!
To date, he has sired 2 sets of twins and 2 sets of triplets.
Of his 8 "kids" - amazingly - 75% are females!
The male governs the gender of the progeny, and doelings are highly prized in the goat world.
Additionally, the majority of his offspring carry his blue eyes!
This is a great opportunity for anyone who wants to start a line of "Mini-Nubians" - contact us!
Here are some pics of the hour-old doelings, "Puimpkin Patches" and "Elvira", HoofHenHoney Farm's  Halloween babies:






Radio Silence - Communication Without Electronics

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Saturday, October 28th, 2017 @ 11:26pm

Good standard info to keep on file, attached - 

Root Cellar storage requirements

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Friday, October 27th, 2017 @ 10:25pm

Root Cellar storage requirements

Cold and very moist:

Beets

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Brussels sprouts

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Cabbage

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Cabbage, Chinese

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Carrots

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Cauliflower

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Celeriac

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Celery

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

 Endive (Escarole)

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Horseradish

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity
  • May be left in the ground undisturbed until needed. Digging can be done unless the soil is frozen hard. A thick layer of mulch may extend your harvest season.

Jerusalem artichoke

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity
  • May be left in the ground undisturbed until needed. Digging can be done unless the soil is frozen hard. A thick layer of mulch may extend your harvest season.

Kale

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Kohlrabi

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Leeks

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Parsnips

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

 Radish, winter

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Rutabaga

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity

 Salsify, oyster plant

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity
  • May be left in the ground undisturbed until needed. Digging can be done unless the soil is frozen hard. A thick layer of mulch may extend your harvest season.

Turnip

  • Cold and very moist
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 90 to 95 percent relative humidity


##############

Apples

  • Cold and moist
  • Do not store with vegetables
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Grapefruit

  • Cold and moist
  • Do not store with vegetables
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Grapes

  • Cold and moist
  • Do not store with vegetables
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Oranges

  • Cold and moist
  • Do not store with vegetables
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Pears

  • Cold and moist
  • Do not store with vegetables
  • 32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Potatoes

  • Cold and moist
  • Do not store with fruits
  • 38 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit ideal
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity


Onions

  • Cool and dry
  • Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
  • 32 to 35 degrees Fahrenheit ideal
  • 60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Beans, dry

  • Cool and dry
  • Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
  • 32 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 60 to 70 percent relative humidity

 Garlic

  • Cool and dry
  • Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
  • 32 to 35 degrees Fahrenheit ideal
  • 60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Peas

  • Cool and dry
  • Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
  • Airtight container
  • 32 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Peppers, hot dried

  • Cool and dry
  • Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
  • 32 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Popcorn

  • Cool and dry
  • Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
  • Airtight container
  • 32 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 60 to 70 percent relative humidity

 Potatoes, sweet

  • Warm and moist
  • To keep sweet potatoes from spoiling in warm and moist storage, do not let temperatures drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Tomatoes

  • Warm and moist
  • To keep green tomatoes from spoiling in warm and moist storage, do not let temperatures drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Pumpkins

  • Warm and dry
  • 50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 60 to 75 percent relative humidity

Squash, winter

  • Warm and dry
  • 50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 60 to 75 percent relative humidity


 Note
Storing foods in a root cellar makes it possible to eat fresh fruits and vegetables from the home garden well into the winter months.

The length of time that fruits and vegetables keep well in root cellars depends on several factors:

  • Early or late crops (late-maturing crops store better)
  • Storage conditions (less-than-ideal conditions shorten storage life)
  • Fruit and vegetable condition at storage time (proper curing of damage-free produce results in longer storage life).

Vegetables and fruits should not be stored together even though temperatures and moisture requirements are similar. As fruits such as apples and pears ripen, they give off ethylene gas which decreases the storage life of vegetables. This is especially evident with potatoes which sprout early if stored near certain fruits. Also, the odor of strong smelling vegetables, like turnips and cabbage, can be absorbed by fruits and other vegetables. Store them away from other food and where the odor cannot waft into the house.

Do not allow fruits and vegetables to freeze.

"Disaster Victim" volunteers needed for training exercise

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Thursday, October 26th, 2017 @ 8:44pm

Get professionally made up in Halloween gore for our CERT disaster training exercise in Sandpoint Sat AM Nov 4th!
Contact ASAP via email:
Brenda V. Bramwell DMD CEM MEP

Bonner County Volunteer Coordinator

Bonner County Emergency Management

KE7JWG

E-mail: Brenda.Bramwell@bonnercountyid.gov

AFFORDABLE - Certified Organic Wheat, Barley, Lentils; Stock up NOW!

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Wednesday, October 25th, 2017 @ 9:35pm

AFFORDABLE - Certified Organic Wheat, Barley, Lentils

We can supply in 50# bags, or totes 1500-2000#.

Dark Northern Spring Wheat 26.5 cents per pound, barley 20 cents per pound. Lentils 90 cents per pound. All commodities are Certified Organic

Thanks

Ted

208 231 5860

Worley

C.E.R.T. Training: Accepting Signups for Next Class!

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Wednesday, October 25th, 2017 @ 9:25pm

(Please forward this to all interested parties)

Our Local Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) is the first of its kind in the entire Inland Northwest!



Our group is well represented, with a full HALF of current graduates coming from the ranks of www.inwPrep.com!
Within a couple weeks, we'll have over 50 CERT Volunteers in the area, based out of Bonner County.  The first class had 20, the second about 30, and there's no sign of this slowing down.  In fact, we have a waiting list already started, and you are invited to get on board!
The "American Redoubt" is stocked with independent thinkers of a survival mindset, ready to help themselves and others in the case of a local - or national - emergency.  Regardless of age or physical ability, there is a place for everyone in the CERT Family.  And, being a volunteer, you only show up to assist once you and your family are safe and secure.  Additionally, you'll never be expected to do anything that makes you feel unsafe or uncomfortable.
The course is both fun and confidence-building, and takes about 3 training days.  Bonner County residents are given priority at signup, but plenty are accepted from out of county- even out of state.

Get a jump on next year's registration by emailing Russ.Spriggs@earthlink.net (simply forward this email) - please answer the following questions:

Name:
Town, State:
Email:
Tel:
Check ANY that apply:

__ I CANNOT make it on Saturdays

__ I CANNOT make it on Sundays

__ I PREFER training on 3 consecutive weekends

__ I PREFER training on every other weekend

You will be notified when the dates and location have been determined for 2018.  There's $20.00 fee for the class which will go toward the purchase of CERT Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) which you will take home with you.
If you are already CERT-qualified from another area, please let us know!
Thanks and Blessings!
Russter

(Postponed from 1/9) ATHOL: Preparing food items to store without spending a fortune!

  • Wednesday, January 17th, 2018 at 7pm - 9pm
    Location: Athol Community Center, 30355 N 3rd St, Athol, ID 83801 (South of Hwy 54 on 3rd St)

    Moved To JANUARY:

    Would you like to:

    ·        Feed two people for a…

    • 7 people attended

BASICS: $1.70 a Day – 90 Days Emergency Food Kit (DIY)

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Monday, October 23rd, 2017 @ 7:27am

http://www.askaprepper.com/1-70-day-90-days-emergency-food-kit/

$1.70 a Day – 90 Days Emergency Food Kit

Fergus Mason

By Fergus Mason October 23, 2017 09:19

$1.70 a Day – 90 Days Emergency Food Kit

One of the biggest obstacles people see when they think about preparedness is cost. They’d like to be prepared to survive a major emergency, but they just don’t think it’s realistic. That’s not really surprising. After all, the average cost of feeding a family of four for a week is over $200, according to the USDA’s figures. The bare minimum you should consider as an emergency food reserve is enough for two weeks, and how many of us can afford to spend $400 on extra food? Realistically, to survive a nuclear attack or similar disaster, you should be looking at a three-month food reserve. That’s thirteen weeks – an extra $2,600. It’s no surprise that most people look at the numbers and decide that, while they’d like to be prepared, it just isn’t achievable.

There are cheaper options, but they’re not much cheaper. You can get a bucket of dehydrated food for a bit over $100 that claims to feed four people for a week, but that’s based on an energy intake of just 1,822 calories a day. That isn’t starvation level – quite – but you’d be pretty hungry all the time. Realistically, however long this type of food pack says it will last, you can cut it by about a quarter. If it says it will feed you for a week, count on five days. That means 90 days’ worth is 18 buckets – close to $1,900, plus tax.

Related: DIY $20 Survival Food Bucket

The good news is that an emergency food supply doesn’t have to cost anything like that much. You’re not buying normal groceries, after all, and this is survival food – the aim is to keep you alive and healthy. A lot of the cost of your weekly groceries is stuff that doesn’t need to go in your emergency supply. Instead, you should focus on cheap staples.

If you look online you’ll find survival food lists promising to let you build up a food reserve at a cost of a dollar a day per person. This is actually pretty easy to achieve. The only drawback is that they’re usually aimed at supplying food to two to three weeks, and the nutrition they provide reflects that. If you want to prepare a full 90-day supply it’s going to cost slightly more – but not a lot more. Here’s how to build up a three-month survival food supply for less than $155 per person – just $1.70 a day.

The Basics

Your first priority is to get enough energy to keep you alive. I’ve aimed for a target of around 2,250 calories per day – significantly more than most emergency food supplies provide. The bulk of this is going to come from carbohydrates, with protein and fat added for balance.

The cheapest, and longest-lasting, sources of both carbohydrates and protein are dry goods. To take advantage of that, this menu is based on three staples – rice, pasta and dried pulses. These are easy to store, can be bought in bulk and are very versatile. Cooked rice or pasta can be easily flavoured or mixed with other ingredients to give an energy-dense meal.

To give the right balance between carbs and protein, the basic daily allowance is split into 6.5 ounces of rice, 6.5 ounces of pasta and 3 ounces of beans or lentils. These are all dry weights, and once they’re cooked it will be more than double that. Obviously you don’t need to eat exactly this amount every day; you can have pasta one day, rice the next and beans or lentils added wherever you want. What’s important is your average intake.

When buying rice, always go for white. The bran layer on brown rice makes it more nutritious, but it also contains oils that will go rancid in a few months – white rice will last almost indefinitely if it’s properly stored. Here you can find 19 more foods that will outlast you. Go for long-grain rice, which has a slightly higher protein content. Parboiled rice has a higher vitamin content; enriched rice is even better, so go for this if you can. Buy twenty-pound bags and you can get it for under 50 cents a pound. To give a three-month supply, get 40 pounds of rice per person.

White pasta is also the best choice, for the same reason – whole grain pasta contains oily husks, which will go rancid quite quickly. Beyond that, it doesn’t matter much what kind of pasta you get. If you stick with own-brand, and buy it in bulk bags, you can get a variety of shapes for around a dollar a pound. Again, you’ll need 40 pounds of pasta per person.

Sugar is another good way to add calories. Some nutritionists claim that sugar is “empty” calories, but that isn’t relevant. Any calories are important in a survival situation, and an ounce of sugar a day will give you another 100 of them. The easiest way to use it is in tea or coffee. Store six pounds of sugar per person.

So far we’ve mainly looked at carbs, although rice and pasta do contain some protein. To boost that, add dried beans or lentils. Both of these are very high in protein, and also contain dietary fiber. You can add some variety here, too; lentils, chickpeas and various types of beans are available, and while they cost more than rice or pasta you can still get them for under $1.50 a pound.

Finally you’ll need some fat in your diet. The best option here is canola oil; it’s inexpensive, versatile and healthy – it’s low in saturated fats and helps lower cholesterol levels. Adding two ounces a day to your diet will give you an adequate fat intake and around 400 more calories a day. To last three months, add 1.5 gallons of oil per person.

Related: Cracking Open a Ten-Year-Old Bucket of Food

Rounding it out

This basic diet will keep you going for two or three weeks, and perhaps up to a month. After three months, though, you’ll be short on some essential nutrients – and probably extremely bored, too. If you want to survive for this long you should add some extras. These will make the diet more balanced, and a lot tastier.

Salt is essential. The typical modern American diet contains too much sodium, but your body does need some to stay alive – and the basic rations we’ve looked at don’t contain enough. A quarter ounce of salt a day is plenty; it will add taste to food as well as keeping your nervous system working. You’ll need 1.5 pounds of salt per person.

Unless you’re a vegetarian, you’ll miss meat. Adding an ounce a day to your diet will make it much more palatable, and meat is also a good source of protein and iron. Any meat will do – Spam, canned beet or chicken, tuna or whatever you prefer. Cans of chili or stew are a good choice, too. Because of the size of typical cans, and the problems with storing opened ones, you’ll find it easier to have larger quantities of meat every few days instead of an ounce every day. Aim for the equivalent of six 15-ounce cans per person.

Related: 10 Long Shelf-Life Canned Foods Every Prepper Should Consider Stockpiling

Vegetables are also a good addition. They also make food more interesting, and they contain fiber as well as carbs and sometimes protein. Opened cans of vegetables can be safely stored for a few days, if you use snap-on lids for the cans or transfer leftovers into Tupperware. Vegetables are also relatively cheap, so get 24 15-ounce cans per person.

Finally, add some extras to add flavor and variety. Hot sauce, herbs and spices, vinegar, garlic powder and tomato paste all let you create tasty meals from basic ingredients. A lot of this is stuff you can throw into a bag as you evacuate the house and head for your shelter, so you might decide not to add it to your actual emergency supply. Don’t forget instant coffee or teabags, too, and get a supply of creamer if you use it.

So, now we have a basic list of food for each person. You can find more detail on our spreadsheet, but this is your shopping list:
• White long grain rice – 40 pounds
• White pasta – 40 pounds
• Dried pulses – 17 pounds
• Canola oil – 1.5 gallons
• Granulated sugar – 6 pounds
• Iodized salt – 1.5 pounds
• Canned meat – 90 ounces
• Canned vegetables – 22.5 pounds

$90 – 90 Days Emergency Food Kit SV

Click on the Image to Enlarge

These quantities were rounded up to the nearest convenient unit, so if you stick to the recommended daily intake you’ll have a small amount of slack. The figures in the spreadsheet have been rounded again to the most economical retail packaging. For example, at Walmart you can get just over six pounds of sugar by buying one 4lb and two 20oz bags – but it’s cheaper to get two 4lb ones, and you end up with more sugar too. Obviously, if there are two of you just buy three bags, which will reduce the cost per person.

This diet is designed to be as affordable as possible, but still supply enough energy and nutrients to keep you going for months at a time. It works out far cheaper than emergency food buckets, and has more energy too. It also gives you the flexibility to create interesting meals by adding a few simple extras that you probably already have in your kitchen.

You may also like:

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How To Buy and Store 260 Pounds of Food for just $83 (Video)

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Vacuum Sealing Could Be Hazardous to Your Health

11 Food Storage Lessons Learned from WWI

Wonderfully successful meeting tonight!

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Thursday, October 19th, 2017 @ 10:27pm

As always, the SL-Blanchard group had an active and interesting meeting.  At this point, we'll continue meeting at the Blanchard Mercantile; good food, beer options, and amenable setup for hearing each other!
We seem to be migrating more toward "the basics" as far as study topics go, and I wanted you all to know about a YT channel I find very authentic & useful; see:
https://www.youtube.com/user/jastownsendandson
Next month, we'll get an independent 3rd party's opinion of the various "Essential Oils" companies out there, courtesy of our critical analyst, Shannon!

1) Thanks to All . . . :2) Free Pistol Classes . . .

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Friday, October 13th, 2017 @ 11:24pm

1) Thanks to All . . . :2) Free Pistol Classes . . .

1-
Thanks to Everyone who participated - as a buyer or vendor - in our "Hunter's Yard Sale" today!  We had scores of vehicles show up, probably a hundred people, and thousands of dollars worth of merchandise got rehomed to some good folks.  Start sorting for the Spring event!

2-
If you've already paid for one of the NRA PistolProf classes, come for a FREE refresher, Saturday or Sunday afternoon!  If not, please round up family, friends and church members for the area's best elements of handgunning class for only $39.  Details at our www.inwPrep.com website!

Thanks!

Russ

Russell S. Spriggs

KI7BIV ~ "Russter" ~ C.E.R.T.

A Local, Veteran-Owned Business

No Texts; 208.660.8877; Fax 855.420.6345

https://www.meetup.com//New-to-Pistols

NRA Pistol Instructor: www.PistolProf.com

Local Events Calendar: http://www.inwPrep.com

Residential Mold Testing: www.cdaInspectors.com

Operating a $30 BAOFENG Ham Radio!

  • Wednesday, October 11th, 2017 at 7pm - 9pm
    Location: Athol Community Center, 30355 N 3rd St, Athol, ID 83801 (South of Hwy 54 on 3rd St)

    How prepared are you to communicate in an emergency situation?
    When the power goes out…

    • 6 people attended

HUNTERS YARD SALE!

  • Friday, October 13th, 2017 at 12pm - 4pm
    Location: Follow signs at Hwy 95 and E Parks Rd south of Athol that will go up by 11:30AM.

    HUNTERS YARD SALE!  More than a dozen rifles, handguns, & antique firearms.  Also ammo,…

    • 3 people attended

FREE PISTOL CLASS This Weekend.

E-mail sent by Russ, PistolProf, Friday, October 6th, 2017 @ 6:40pm

If you have PAID for a pistol class with me in the past, you may attend one next weekend FREE as a refresher!  See:
https://www.meetup.com/New-to-Pistols/
And sign up for either Sat or Sun Afternoon (CDA or Sandpoint).
MUST register to attend; as space is available!

No prior class?  This is only $39 bucks!
Thanks!
Russ

When There is No Vet, Pt.2

  • Saturday, October 21st, 2017 at 6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Location: 216 S, Washington St, Newport

    Part 2 of 2

When There is No Vet, Pt.1

  • Saturday, October 7th, 2017 at 6:30pm
    Location: 216 S, Washington St, Newport

    Part 1 of 2

    • 1 person attended

C.E.R.T. 8AM

  • Saturday, October 7th, 2017 at 8am - 4:30pm, Saturday, October 21st, 2017 at 8am - 4:30pm, Saturday, November 4th, 2017 at 8am - 4:30pm
    Location: Sandpoint

    Community Emergency Response Team - Posted as a reminder for those who have already registered!…

Newport / Priest River Mutual Assistance Group (1st & 3rd Saturdays)

  • Saturday, December 16th, 2017 at 6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Location: 216 S. Washington St (Hospitality House), Newport, WA

    Newport / Priest River Mutual Assistance Group (1st & 3rd Saturdays)
    We share the…

Newport / Priest River Mutual Assistance Group (1st & 3rd Saturdays)

  • Saturday, December 2nd, 2017 at 6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Location: 216 S. Washington St (Hospitality House), Newport, WA

    Newport / Priest River Mutual Assistance Group (1st & 3rd Saturdays)
    We share the…

    • 1 person attended

Newport / Priest River Mutual Assistance Group (1st & 3rd Saturdays)

  • Saturday, November 18th, 2017 at 6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Location: 216 S. Washington St (Hospitality House), Newport, WA

    Newport / Priest River Mutual Assistance Group (1st & 3rd Saturdays)

    We share the…

    • 1 person attended

"what grows best around here?" Newport (1st & 3rd Saturdays)

  • Saturday, November 4th, 2017 at 6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Location: 216 S. Washington St (Hospitality House), Newport, WA

    What grows best around here?  - OK, the season's over, so what do we focus on NEXT year to…

    • 2 people attended

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